RSNSW Webmaster - The Royal Society of NSW - Royal Society of NSW News & Events

Emeritus Professor Noel Hush AO DistFRSN

Emeritus Professor Noel Hush AO DistFRSN

Noel Hush, one of our inaugural Fellows (and Distinguished Fellow) died on Wednesday 20 March, following a heart attack.  He was 94.

Professor Hush was a chemist of international standing.  After graduating from the University of Sydney in the late 1940s and after completing a couple of years there as a research fellow, he took up various research positions in the United Kingdom.  He returned to Australia in 1971 to establish the Department of Theoretical Chemistry, a group that he led for nearly 20 years until his formal retirement.

He received many Australian and international accolades including Fellowship of the Australian Academy of Science and the Royal Society (London) and was a foreign associate of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

More details of his career (and a full listing of his many postnominals) can be found here.

A memorial service will be held in the Great Hall of the University of Sydney on Monday 27 May at 10 am (note changed date and time from what was earlier given here).

  30 Hits
30 Hits

RSNSW Fellow to give public lecture

RSNSW Fellow to give public lecture

University of Cambridge Professor Herbert Huppert FRS FRSN is giving a public lecture at Sydney University on Wednesday 17 April.

Understanding carbon in the air: can we avert a climate catastrophe?

The event is free, but registration is necessary.

  21 Hits
21 Hits

Council election 2019

Council election 2019

The 152nd AGM will be held prior to the OGM on Wednesday 3 April 2019 at the State Library of NSW, Shakespeare Place, Sydney.  As part of the AGM, the election of candidates to Council will be held.  Polling will open at 5.30 pm and close at 6.15 pm.  There are 12 candidates for 10 positions as Councillors; the list of candidates is available here.

The AGM agenda and accompanying documents, including a proxy form, will be circulated direct to Members.

  42 Hits
42 Hits

Story from the Periodic Table

Story from the Periodic Table

Immediate past-President Brynn Hibbert is the winner of the first round of the Royal Australian Chemical Institute's competition for stories about the periodic table, run as part of the International Year of the Periodic Table.  You can read his story about Sir Humphry Davy and the discovery of iodine here.

  41 Hits
41 Hits

Let's build something brilliant

Let's build something brilliant

The following letter by our President, Emeritus Professor Ian Sloan AO, was published in the Sydney Morning Herald on Monday 4 March 2019 under the above headline (which was the main letters headline for the day).

“The Royal Society of NSW, Australia’s oldest scientific and cultural organisation, applauds the recommendation of the Upper House’s Parliamentary Committee to retain the Powerhouse Museum at Ultimo, and to support a major new cultural institution at Parramatta.

“The right place for the Museum of Applied Arts and Science, the Powerhouse Museum, is where it is now, as an integral part of Sydney history, close to Sydney Observatory, Darling Harbour and universities, and well located as a rich educational and tourist resource.

“The Royal Society is excited that the report recognises the urgent need for renovation of the Powerhouse Museum, to make up for the years of neglect that have allowed this priceless asset to fall behind other science museums around the world.

“In planning the Parramatta museum, the needs and interests of Parramatta and NSW should be assessed, and an exciting and innovative museum then designed. We in NSW have, for example, no first people’s museum, nor a heritage and immigration museum. Such choices would be drawcards for locals and tourists alike, bringing a new audience to Parramatta. Instead of wasting funds moving a valuable existing collection to a new place, let’s use public funds to build something new and brilliant.”

Professor Ian Sloan
President, Royal Society of NSW

  49 Hits
49 Hits

FRSNs in 2019 Australia Day honours

FRSNs in 2019 Australia Day honours

Australia Day honours have been awarded to the following:

Jillian Broadbent AO FRSN, elevated to AC

Leonard Fisher FRSN, appointed OAM

(Barney) Bevil Milton Glover FRSN, appointed AO

Adrian Hibberd FRSN, appointed AM

Robert Bain Thomas AM FRSN, elevated to AO

If you know of any Members or Fellows we have missed, please email the Royal Society at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

  94 Hits
94 Hits

1270th OGM and open lecture

1270th OGM and open lecture

Royal Society of NSW Scholarship Award Winners for 2019

Fiona McDougall, Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University
Evelyn Todd, School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Sydney

There was also a 3-minute thesis (3MT) talk: “Finding the best-fitting jeans for railway foundations” by Mr Chuhao Liu, 2018 3MT winner, University of Wollongong.

Wednesday 6 February 2019
Gallery Room, State Library of NSW

Royal Society of NSW Scholarships
The Royal Society of New South Wales Scholarships recognise outstanding achievements by individuals working towards a research degree in a science-related field within New South Wales or the Australian Capital Territory. Each year up to three scholarships of $500 plus and a complimentary year of membership of the Society are awarded. The award winners give talks about their research at the first OGM each year.

Fiona McDougallFiona McDougall

Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University

“Human-associated bacteria and antibiotic resistance in grey-headed flying foxes”

Over recent decades, the number of grey-headed flying foxes (also known as fruit bats) roosting in urban environments has increased dramatically. Each year, several thousand sick, injured and orphaned flying foxes enter wildlife rehabilitation facilities. In urban areas and rehabilitation facilities, flying foxes encounter human-associated bacteria which may be pathogenic. At present, the transmission of human-associated organisms between humans and flying foxes is poorly understood. Additionally, antibiotic-resistant bacteria are spreading from humans to wildlife; currently there is a paucity of surveillance data on the spread of antibiotic resistance into Australian wildlife, including flying foxes.
This research examining the spread of human-associated bacteria (escherichia coli and klebsiella pneumoniae) to flying foxes is providing insight into the unique diversity and ecology of these bacteria in the grey-headed flying fox (pteropus poliocephalus). Flying foxes have also acquired antibiotic-resistant bacteria, including multidrug-resistant escherichia coli, in both urban and rehabilitation settings. The prevalence of genetic determinants of antibiotic resistance is higher in flying foxes in rehabilitation facilities than in wild urban flying foxes. We are yet to understand the implications of these findings on the management and conservation of the endangered grey-headed flying fox.

Fiona McDougall obtained a Bachelor of Veterinary Science from the University of Sydney in 1998 and subsequently spent over ten years working as a veterinarian and conducting biomedical and wildlife research. In 2013 she obtained a Master of Veterinary Studies in conservation medicine from Murdoch University. She is currently in the third year of her PhD at Macquarie University. In 2017 she was awarded a Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment grant, and she is also a co-investigator on a Lake Macquarie Environmental Trust grant (2017).

Evelyn ToddEvelyn Todd

School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Sydney

“Using genetics to improve athletic performance in thoroughbred horses”

Thoroughbred horse racing holds both historical and economic significance in Australian society, dating back to the early colonial years of settlement. The thoroughbred racing and breeding industry is also a major contributor to the Australian economy due to the internationally recognised quality of the horses it produces.
The thoroughbred horse breed was founded in the 18th century, making it the oldest closed animal population in the world. Uniquely, all modern thoroughbred horses throughout the world trace their pedigree back to this time (an average of 24 generations). Although thoroughbreds are the product of many generations of inbreeding for the selection of racing performance, the population is still viable and thriving. Evelyn's research examines how these many generations of selective breeding has influenced the genetic characteristics of modern thoroughbred horses. These findings assist in understanding the effects of long-term selection on the health and viability of animal populations.

Evelyn Todd is a PhD student at University of Sydney, researching and writing a thesis titled “Inbreeding and performance genetics in horses”. She started her PhD candidature at the beginning of 2017, having completed a Bachelor of Science (Honours) in 2015. Her self-directed honours thesis focussed on the effects of inbreeding on racing performance in thoroughbred horses. After completing her undergraduate degree, she spent a year working in industry before returning to postgraduate study. Her PhD aims to understand genetic trends in horse populations, particularly focussing on thoroughbred racehorses.

Three-minute thesis (3MT) talk
The Three-Minute Thesis (3MT) competition brings together some of the best and brightest PhD students, who have just three minutes to explain what they are doing, how they are doing it, and why it is important. The competition cultivates students’ academic, presentation, and research communication skills, and their capacity to communicate complex ideas to a non-specialist audience. Competitors are allowed one PowerPoint slide, but no other resources or props.

This month’s presentation, “Finding the best-fitting jeans for railway foundations”, was by Mr Chuhao Liu, Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences, University of Wollongong, winner of the University of Wollongong 2018 3MT competition.

Train is a very popular choice for travelling and freight transport in Australia. However, track foundation particles (ballast) are almost free to move laterally and subjected to significant breakage upon repeated train passage. To solve this problem, industry currently installs a plastic grid, named Geogrid, inside the railway foundations. But the best design of geogrid remains an open question. The research aims to find out the optimum design of geogrid, especially the size of the hole (aperture) on the grid, and develop a standard for rail manufacturing.

  117 Hits
117 Hits

FRSN to be Lord Prior of St John International

FRSN to be Lord Prior of St John International

Professor Mark Compton FRSN has been announced as the next Lord Prior of the Order of St John, also known as St John International.  The Order is devoted to the relief of sickness and injury, receiving a royal charter from Queen Victoria in 1888.  It is perhaps best known in Australia for St John Ambulance.

  102 Hits
102 Hits

Calendar of Sydney meetings in 2019

Calendar of Sydney meetings in 2019
Wednesday 6 February

1270th OGM and open lecture: 2018 Scholarship presentations

Evelyn Todd, University of Sydney

“Using genetics to improve athletic performance in throughbred horses”

Fiona McDougall, Macquarie University

“Human-associated bacteria and antibiotic resistance in grey-headed flying foxes”

Venue: State Library of NSW, Shakespeare Place, Sydney

Time: 6 for 6.30pm

Monday 25 February

Annual Meeting of the Four Societies

“Nuclear energy as an option for Australia?”

Helen Cook, GNE Advisory

Venue: Allens, Level 28, Deutsche Bank Place, 126 Phillip Street, Sydney

Time: 7.15 ‒ 9am

Tuesday 26 February

RSNSW/SMSA joint series "Speaking of music"

“Jazz and democracy”

Dr. Wesley J. Watkins IV

Venue: Sydney Mechanics' School of Arts

Time: 6 for 6.30pm

Wednesday 6 March

1271st OGM and open lecture

“Using genomics to conserve Australia's biodiversity”

Professor Katherine Belov FRSN, School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Sydney

Venue: State Library of NSW, Shakespeare Place, Sydney

Time: 6 for 6.30pm

Thursday 21 March

RSNSW/SMSA joint series "Women and science"

“Mary Shelley, scientist, and Frankenstein”

Suzanne Burdon

Venue: Sydney Mechanics' School of Arts

Time: 6 for 6.30pm

Wednesday 3 April

AGM and 1272nd OGM and open lecture

Address by ex-President: “Measuring what we can: or how to lose weight on May 20th”

Emeritus Professor Brynn Hibbert AM FRSN, School of Chemistry, UNSW

Venue: State Library of NSW, Shakespeare Place, Sydney

Time: 5.45 for 6pm start of AGM. Open lecture and OGM 6.30pm

Thursday 2 May

RSNSW/SMSA joint series "Women and science"

“Ada Lovelace”

Susannah Fullerton OAM FRSN

Venue: Sydney Mechanics' School of Arts

Time: 6 for 6.30pm

Friday 10 May

Annual dinner of the Royal Society of NSW

Guest of honour: Her Excellency Margaret Beazley AO QC, Governor of NSW

Presentation of awards for 2018

Distinguished Fellow's address: Scientia Professor Michelle Simmons FRS FAA DistFRSN FTSE, School of Physics, UNSW
“The new field of atomic electronics”

Venue: Swissotel, 48 Market St, Sydney

Time: 6.30 for 7pm

Thursday 30 May

RSNSW/SMSA joint series "Women and science"

“Visual perception and aboriginal art of Pupunya Tula”

Emeritus Professor Barbara Gillam FASSA FRSN

Venue: Sydney Mechanics' School of Arts

Time: 6 for 6.30pm

date tba

Clarke lecture

“tba”

Professor Emma Johnston AO FAA FRSN, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, UNSW

Venue: tba

Time: tba

Wednesday 5 June

1273rd OGM and open lecture

“Psychology (details tba)”

Dr Kate Faasse, School of Psychology, UNSW

Venue: State Library of NSW, Shakespeare Place, Sydney

Time: 6 for 6.30pm

Thursday 20 June

RSNSW/SMSA joint series "Women and science"

“tba”

speaker tba

Venue: Sydney Mechanics' School of Arts

Time: 6 for 6.30pm

Wednesday 4 July

1274th OGM and open lecture

“History of polymers”

Professor Robert Burford FRSN, School of Chemical Engineering, UNSW

Venue: State Library of NSW, Shakespeare Place, Sydney

Time: 6 for 6.30pm

Thursday 18 July

RSNSW/SMSA joint series "Women and science"

“tba”

speaker tba

Venue: Sydney Mechanics' School of Arts

Time: 6 for 6.30pm

Wednesday 7 August

1275th OGM and open lecture

“Science and politics”

Professor Peter Shergold AC FRSN, Chancellor, Western Sydney University

Venue: State Library of NSW, Shakespeare Place, Sydney

Time: 6 for 6.30pm

August

Poggendorf lecture

“tba”

speaker tba

Venue: tba

Time: 5:30 for 6pm

August

four Science Week talks

individual talk topics tba

speakers tba

Venue: Sydney Mechanics' School of Arts

Times: tba

Wednesday 4 September

1276th OGM and open lecture

“History and sociology of medicine in south-east Asia”

Associate Professor Hans Pols, School of History and Philosophy of Science, University of Sydney

Venue: State Library of NSW, Shakespeare Place, Sydney

Time: 6 for 6.30pm

Thursday 19 September

RSNSW/SMSA joint series "Women and science"

“tba”

speaker tba

Venue: Sydney Mechanics' School of Arts

Time: 6 for 6.30pm

Wednesday 2 October

1277th OGM and open lecture

“Other minds”

Professor Peter Godfrey-Smith, School of History and Philosophy of Science, University of Sydney

Venue: State Library of NSW, Shakespeare Place, Sydney

Time: 6 for 6.30pm

Thursday 17 October

RSNSW/SMSA joint series "Women and science"

“Electricity, astronomy and natural history”

Anne Harbers

Venue: Sydney Mechanics' School of Arts

Time: 6 for 6.30pm

Wednesday 6 November

1278th OGM and open lecture

“Visual perception and Aboriginal art”

Scientia Professor Barbara Gillam FASSA FRSN, School of Psychology, UNSW

Venue: State Library of NSW, Shakespeare Place, Sydney

Time: 6 for 6.30pm

?? November

Dirac lecture

“Physics (details tba)”

Venue: UNSW

Time: tba

Thursday 7 November

Royal Society of NSW and Four Learned Academies Forum

“Making space for Australia”

Venue: NSW Government House, Sydney

Time: tba

Thursday 21 November

RSNSW/SMSA joint series "Women and science"

“An accidental radio astronomer”

Emeritus Professor Anne Green

Venue: Sydney Mechanics' School of Arts

Time: 6 for 6.30pm

Wednesday 4 December

1279th OGM and open lecture

Royal Society of NSW 2019 Jak Kelly Award and Christmas party

“tba”

Jak Kelly Award winner (tba)

Venue: State Library of NSW, Shakespeare Place, Sydney

Time: 6 for 6.30pm

  175 Hits
175 Hits

RSNSW Fellows investigate the Opal Tower

RSNSW Fellows investigate the Opal Tower

Emeritus Professor John Carter AM FRSN and Professor Mark Hoffman FRSN have been appointed by the NSW Department of Planning and Environment to investigate the structural integrity of the Opal Tower apartment building at Homebush.  We wish them speedy success.

(Following initial investigations, Professor Stephen Foster was also engaged to assist.)

  99 Hits
99 Hits

RSNSW awards for 2018

RSNSW awards for 2018

The Society's awards for 2018 (Clarke Medal, Edgeworth David Medal, History & Philosophy of Science Medal, James Cook Medal, Poggendorff Lecture and RSNSW Scholarship) were announced by the President at the OGM on 5 December. Full details are available here.

  111 Hits
111 Hits

Images from the 2018 Forum

Images from the 2018 Forum

Gov house and groupGovernment House and group outside

Anne Williamson and Phil WaiteAnne Williamson and Phil Waite

Ian Wilkinson and others in lectureIan Wilkinson and others in lecture

President with Brian and BrynnPresident with Brian and Brynn

Louise YoungLouise Young

Virginia JudgeVirginia Judge

Mary-Anne Williams lecturingMary-Anne Williams lecturing

  98 Hits
98 Hits

RSNSW and Four Academies Forum 2018

RSNSW and Four Academies Forum 2018

“Towards a prosperous and sustainable Australia: what now for the lucky country?”

Government House

Hosted by His Excellency General The Honourable David Hurley AC DSC (ret’d.), Governor of NSW and Patron of the Royal Society of NSW

Thursday 29 November 2018
Government House, Sydney

A day dissecting the big questions facing Australia today and into the future. Australia’s 27 years of uninterrupted growth, the longest period without a recession of any developed country, puts it in an enviable position. Yet polling of the Australian population shows a large diversity of opinion on whether people feel better off. Rising wealth inequality, unaffordable housing, increasing traffic congestion, under-employment and increasingly polarised political opinion are hardly signs of a prosperous and harmonious society. Our environment is also suffering – loss of biodiversity, wildlife habitat and topsoil through land clearing and land-use change; the health and resilience of our river systems, forests and agricultural industries are subject to an inexorably warming climate and greater weather extremes.

Is the focus on growth and GDP pushing Australia in the wrong direction? Does Australia have an optimal population? What happens when we stop borrowing from future generations to support our current lifestyles and incessant consumption? Is a steady-state society possible, or desirable, and if so what would it look like?

The 2018 Royal Society of NSW and Four Academies Forum will examine the implications of the focus on growth (as measured by GDP) and population on our society, our economy and the environment. What are the social constructs and economic assumptions on which government policies are based? Our economy has become bifurcated towards resources and services – is this a healthy evolution or is it a hollowing-out of the economy that imperils Australia’s future? What role can science and technology play in a world of increasing automation and computer power? Is full employment possible, or desirable, and what will people do with their spare time?

The programme for the day is available here.

The day concluded with a drinks reception.

  288 Hits
288 Hits

Kurt Lambeck awarded 2018 Prime Minister’s Prize

Kurt Lambeck awarded 2018 Prime Minister’s Prize

Kurt LambeckDistinguished Fellow of RSNSW, Professor Kurt Lambeck AO FRS FAA has been awarded the 2018 Prime Minister’s Prize for Science. The award, made at the Prime Minister’s Prize event at Canberra’s Parliament House on 17 October, recognises Lambeck’s 50-year contribution to Australian and global science through his geodesy research.

According to the prize announcement from the Prime Minister’s office, “Kurt Lambeck AO has revealed how our planet changes shape—every second, every day, and over millennia. These changes influence sea levels, the movement of continents, and the orbits of satellites. Kurt’s original work in the 1960s enabled accurate planning of space missions. It led him to use the deformation of continents during the ice ages to study changes deep in the mantle of the planet. It also led to a better understanding of the impact of sea level changes on human civilization in the past, present and future.”

  116 Hits
116 Hits

Chris Bertram wins David Dewhurst Award

Chris Bertram wins David Dewhurst Award

Council member Dr Chris Bertram FRSN was presented with the David Dewhurst Award at the recent Australian Biomedical Engineering Conference. The David Dewhurst Award is given annually by Engineers Australia (Australia's peak body for engineers, representing over 100,000 members) to a biomedical engineer who has made exceptional, sustained and significant contributions to the field.

  131 Hits
131 Hits

International Mathematical Union honours Nalini Joshi

International Mathematical Union honours Nalini Joshi

Professor Nalini Joshi AO FRSN has been elected Vice-President of the International Mathematical Union, from the start of 2019. She becomes the first Australian to hold this position.  Besides being a Fellow of the Royal Society of NSW, Professor Joshi is a member of its governing Council.

  190 Hits
190 Hits

Recent honours for RSNSW Fellows

Recent honours for RSNSW Fellows

Graeme Jameson / Michelle SimmonsTwo of our members have recently been elected as Fellows of the prestigious Royal Society of London. They are Michelle Simmons DistFRSN (who is already Australian of the Year) and Graeme Jameson FRSN from the University of Newcastle.

Veena SahajwallaAnd recently elected FRSN Veena Sahajwalla has just been elected as a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science.

We also congratulate our Fellows who received an award in the latest Queen’s Honours List:
Geoffrey Harcourt AC
David Cook AO and Emma Johnston AO
Barbara Briggs AM and Brynn Hibbert AM, our immediate past President

  229 Hits
229 Hits

New President's message

New President's message

At the 151st AGM held on 4 April 2018, Emeritus Scientia Professor Ian Sloan AO FRSN was installed as President of the Society.  As Professor Sloan was overseas and unable to attend the meeting, he addressed the audience in a video.  The text of his address is given here.


Ian SloanIf you are seeing this video, then I must have been elected as President of the Royal Society of New South Wales, and I must be in Providence, Rhode Island.  I’m sorry that I can’t be with you.

What an honour it is to be President of our Royal Society!  By my count I am the 119th President, in a line stretching back to 1821.

Let me tell you a little about our first President.  Sir Thomas arrived as Governor of New South Wales in 1821.  He was a soldier (finishing with the rank of Major General).  But he was also a scientist, specifically an astronomer, and a great patron of science.  He built an astronomical observatory at Parramatta, something wonderful to think about with the colony only 35 years old.  After returning to Great Britain he was awarded the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society.

Our first President was a fine example of all that is best about our Royal Society.  There are many other great names among the presidents that follow, but I want to jump forward around 200 years, because our proud history counts for little unless we are doing something now.  I want to pay particular respect to my recent predecessors as President: to John Hardie and Donald Hector, and especially to immediate-past-President Brynn Hibbert.  These three have presided over major transformation and reform.  Especially important has been the reinvention of the Fellows program, and a renewed emphasis on expanded membership.  By now the Fellows and Members together number around 400, giving us increased strength as a society.  Recent presidents have also been taking seriously the commitment not just to science (though science remains deep in our DNA) but also to “Art, Literature and Philosophy”, which we nowadays interpret rather broadly, to include all of the key intellectual and creative endeavours of our time.  My commitment as President will be to continue to develop in these directions, and to make sure that the Society is important to its Members and Fellows.

Thank you.

  268 Hits
268 Hits

Results of the Council election 2018

Results of the Council election 2018

In accordance with the Society's rules, the list of candidates is displayed here.

The election took place at the annual general meeting on Wednesday 4 April 2018 at the Union University & Schools Club, 25 Bent Street, Sydney.  Polling opened at 5.30pm and closed at 6.15pm.

The results of the election were as follows.

Aslaksen

Erik

Councillor - TAS management

Bertram

Chris

Honorary Webmaster

Bhathal

Ragbir

Honorary Librarian

Buttner

Herma

Honorary Secretary (General)

Choucair

Mohammad

Councillor

Clancy

Robert

Councillor

Dyson

Laurel

Councillor - Bulletin Editor

Gibson

Margaret

Councillor – new

Hardie

John

Vice-President 

Hector

Donald

Councillor

Hibbert

Brynn

Vice-President – immediate past president

Joshi

Nalini

Councillor – new 

Judge

Virginia

Councillor – new

Kehoe

Jim

Councillor 

Marks

Robert

Honorary Secretary (Editor)

Sloan

Ian

President

Wheeldon

Judith

Vice-President

Wilkinson

Ian

Councillor

Wilmott 

Richard

Honorary Treasurer

Wood

Anne

Southern Highlands representative (to be confirmed)

  305 Hits
305 Hits

European tour: the history of science

European tour: the history of science

Academy Travel
Padua – Florence – Paris – London

A tour for the Royal Society of NSW in conjunction with the State Library of NSW Foundation

19 September – 4 October 2019

Overview

Explore the history of science, from Vesalius in Padua to Galileo in Florence and the flourishing of modern science in Paris and London. This 16-day private tour for the Royal Society of NSW in conjunction with The State Library of NSW Foundation includes guided visits to many exceptional museums, rare access to collections, libraries and archival material, and the expert guidance of specialists and curators. It follows the great story of modern science, taking you from Padua to Florence, Paris and London, and includes day trips to Bologna, Siena and Cambridge. A four-night pre-tour extension to Venice is also available.

Discover
• The birth of modern science, from Galileo’s telescopes to Darwin’s theory of evolution
• The history of medicine: Vesalius in Padua, Pasteur in Paris and the medical collections of London
• The transmission of knowledge, from rare books and manuscripts to the modern museum
• The history of the university at Padua, Bologna, Paris and Cambridge
• Interaction between the arts and sciences in moments of great change from the Renaissance to the modern world.

Tour details

Dates: 19 September – 4 October 2019
Price: $9,270 pp. twin share; $2,280 single supplement
For more information and to register your interest, contact Academy Travel on 9235 0023 or via This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Maximum group size: 20

Tour highlights

• Padua: the world’s first anatomy theatre, the oldest botanic garden and Giotto’s Scrovegni Chapel
• Special access to library collections in Florence, Paris and London
• Private tour of the Pompidou Centre, Paris’ modern art museum
• Day trips to Siena, Bologna, Cambridge and Greenwich
• Specialist museums dedicated to Pasteur, Curie, Galileo and Darwin
• London science: from the manuscripts of the Wellcome Library to the National Science Museum.

Itinerary

map of Europe Tour 2019Days 1–3: arrive Padua.  Visit the world’s oldest anatomy theatre and oldest botanic garden, and the Scrovegni Chapel, Giotto’s masterpiece. Day trip to Bologna.
Days 4–6: explore Florence, including the Galileo Museum, Uffizi, with special access to rare collections. Day trip to Siena and the wonderful cuisine of Chianti.
Days 7–10: discover a different side of Paris, from special museums dedicated to Pasteur and Curie to a private tour of the Pompidou Centre.
Days 11–15: arrive London. Enjoy visits to Down House (the home of Charles Darwin), the National Observatory and prime meridian at Greenwich, and a range of museums, from the Museum of Natural History to the private collection of the Royal College of Physicians. Day trip to Cambridge.
Day 16: departure.

Tour leader

Emeritus Professor Robert Clancy AM FRSN has had a distinguished career in medical research and has published books on the early mapping of Australia. He has led many similar successful expeditions. Expert guides will meet the group in each destination.

  224 Hits
224 Hits
Site by ezerus.com.au

Privacy policy  |  Links to other societies

All rights reserved; copyright © The Royal Society of NSW.