FEB
02

1300th OGM and Open Lecture

Professor Mark Scott “Where next for higher education after COVID-19?”

Professor Mark Scott AO FRSN

Vice-Chancellor and Principal
The University of Sydney

Date: Wednesday, 2 February 2022, 6.30 pm AEDT 
Venue: Zoom Webinar.  Click here for help with getting started with Zoom. 
Entry: No Charge
All are welcome

Summary:  The COVID-19 pandemic forced dramatic changes to teaching, research and revenue sources for Australian universities. In this talk, University of Sydney Vice-Chancellor and Principal Professor Mark Scott AO will discuss how the higher education sector can build on the lessons made in the past two years to deliver transformational teaching and learning, and support research that changes the world for good.

As Vice-Chancellor and Principal, Professor Mark Scott AO FRSN leads the University of Sydney’s strategic direction, in close consultation with the Chancellor, senior leaders and the University’s Senate and Academic Board.

Professor Scott is a proud alumnus of the University and holds a Bachelor of Arts, a Diploma of Education, a Master of Arts (Political Science and Government), an Honorary Doctorate (Letters) and a Professor of Practice (Education and Media) from the University of Sydney, as well as a Master of Public Administration from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He has also been awarded honorary doctorates from the University of NSW and University of Technology Sydney.

In the role of Vice-Chancellor, he is committed to driving transformative change that will support students and staff from all backgrounds to excel and realise their potential, solve the world’s most pressing challenges and secure a prosperous future for the University.

Professor Scott is a highly respected and successful senior leader of large and complex institutions, across public service, education and the media. Under his leadership as Secretary of the NSW Department of Education (2016 to 2021) the Department secured a record 10-year funding agreement for public schools, created School Infrastructure NSW to deliver an additional 160,000 classroom places and established the School Leadership Institute to train and develop aspiring school principals across the state.

His distinguished record of strategic leadership includes a decade as Managing Director of the ABC (2006 to 2016), where he led the organisation’s transformation to be a public broadcaster in the digital era. Over that time, the ABC created new services like iview, News 24, ABC3 and digital radio; and expanded online and mobile services, such as podcasting and ABC News online.

Professor Scott has also held a number of senior editorial roles at Fairfax, including Education Editor of The Sydney Morning Herald and Editor-in-Chief of metropolitan, regional and community newspapers. His contribution to education reaches back to the start of his career, as a teacher in Sydney. He built on his interest in education with senior policy and leadership positions with two NSW education ministers – Terry Metherell and Virginia Chadwick – and in 2011 he was named an Officer of the Order of Australia.

JAN
09

RSNSW Exhibition: NEXUS 2022

RSNSW Exhibition: NEXUS Cover Image

Jean Garling Room
Mitchell Building, State Library of NSW
1 Shakespeare Place, Sydney

EXHIBITION NOW OPEN

Opening Hours: Monday 2-5 pm; Thursday 2-5 pm; Sunday 2-5 pm from 9 January until 30 June 2022

About the Exhibition: This Exhibition begins a year of celebrations to mark the Society’s contributions to the intellectual life of NSW over 200 years. It is the perfect moment to reinforce our commitment to enriching lives through knowledge and inquiry. As we think about our future, we are informed by our history.

NEXUS has two meanings: a central or focal point; and a connection or series of connections linking two or more things. From the beginning, the Society has epitomised both meanings, as a forum for ideas and discovery, exposing us to the latest research and promoting awareness of some of the major issues confronting humanity. With 200 years of history, the exhibition can only showcase a fraction of the Society’s archives and achievements in telling the story of its Origins, Ideas, Advances, and Impacts.

Highlights of the exhibition include: 

  • Letters from Professor Sir T W Edgeworth David, Antarctic explorer, on sun thaw line observations and arranging a presentation on the British Antarctic Expedition (1907 – 1909) led by Sir Ernest Shackleton
  • Two original letters, including one with box-kite illustrations, of Lawrence Hargrave, a noted aviation pioneer and the first in Australia to fly (attached to four box kites of his own design), who published 23 papers on aeronautics in the Society’s Journal & Proceedings.
FEB
16

Annual Meeting of the Four Societies 2022

Four Societies logoEngineering and related Challenges in Decarbonising the Electricity System

Professor Stephen Wilson 
University of Queensland

A joint meeting of the Australian Institute of Energy, the Australian Nuclear Association, the Sydney Division of Engineers Australia, and the Royal Society of NSW — this year organised by the Australian Nuclear Association.

Date: Wednesday, 16 February 2022, 6.00 pm AEDT
Venue: Either in person at the UTS Aerial Function Centre ( Building 10, Level 7, 235 Jones Street, Ultimo) and via a Zoom webinar
Entry: No charge
Registration:  is required for in-person attendance at UTS or the Zoom Webinar

Summary: Everyone, it seems, is talking about the energy transition. Electricity is pivotal, thermal power plants are highly visible, and few in number. Although far short of total greenhouse gas emissions, power generation is the single largest piece of the emissions pie in most countries, including Australia. Electricity is the obvious place to start reducing carbon dioxide emissions, and reduction strategies in other sectors—such as battery-powered vehicles—rely on more electricity. Achieving net-zero emissions economy-wide will require negative emissions somewhere, most likely including in the electricity sector. 

Some assume that 100% renewable energy is a simple, complete, ‘plug-and-play’ solution. This would be appealing, if not for the fine print. Electricity is the largest and seems the easiest sector. But that doesn’t mean decarbonising electricity will be easy, cheap, and sustainably popular. Engineering complete decarbonisation of electricity systems within the next three decades is likely to become progressively harder. Hence it will be increasingly expensive, and risks becoming politically unpopular.

In this talk, Stephen Wilson will share some insights from recent studies and current research, explore with Australian examples some of the engineering-related challenges that will need to be solved, and note opportunities for Australian engineering to contribute at home and abroad.

Stephen WilsonStephen Wilson is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Queensland who has worked at the intersection of engineering, economics and policy, energy security and the geopolitics of energy and resources across three decades and in over 30 countries. Stephen has worked on projects in energy efficiency and demand-side management, electricity regulation, tariffs and pricing, climate change and energy policy, natural gas, pipeline and storage infrastructure master plans, security of supply and bankability studies, coal and uranium mining, renewable energy and system modelling. Originally trained as a mechanical engineer, Stephen has spent his career in energy economics, as a consultant based in Melbourne, Hong Kong and later London, as general manager of market and industry analysis in the energy product group of a global mining company, and as a full-time teaching and research Professor at UQ. Stephen is Managing Director of Cape Otway Associates.

Capture

APR
06

1302th OGM and Open Lecture

Professor Benjamin Eggleton “New frontiers in smart sensor technology for a healthier, safer and sustainable future”

Professor Benjamin Eggleton FRSN FAA FTSE FOSA FIEEE FSPIE
Director, University of Sydney Nano Institute and Co-Director, NSW Smart Sensing Network

Date: Wednesday, 6 April 2022, 6.30 pm AEST 
Venue: To be advised 
Entry: No charge
All are welcome

Summary:  Sensor devices that detect events or changes in their environment are used in everyday objects such as smartphones and ubiquitous applications of which most people are never aware. Recent advances in device physics, nanotechnology, AI, and sensor fusion are leading to a revolution in smart sensor technology that will provide multi-faceted interfaces to the three-dimensional physical, chemical, and data environment, enabling high-performance information gathering and real-time situational awareness. My talk overviews recent examples from industry and end-user sponsored projects, including research from the NSW Smart Sensing Network where we are exploring how smart sensors can forecast air pollution and urban heat, reduce the maintenance costs associated with leaks and breaks of water pipes, and remotely monitor soil moisture; from Sydney Nano we will see how single-molecule sensing and wearables are providing for the rapid testing of infectious disease, underpinning a robust roadmap to COVID-19 recovery and beyond; and finally from the Jericho Smart Sensing sponsored by the Royal Australian Air Force, how smart sensors are providing the Air Force with enhanced, advanced situational awareness that enables smart, timely decision-making.

Ben Eggleton is a Professor of Physics at the University of Sydney, Director of the University of Sydney Nano Institute (Sydney Nano), and co-Director of the NSW Smart Sensing Network. He has received $60 million in research funding, was an ARC Laureate Fellow, and was founding director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Ultrahigh Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS). His ground-breaking research in photonics underpins novel applications in telecommunications, quantum technologies, and smart sensors. He has published over 500 journal papers cited over 40,000 times with an h-number of 110 (Google Scholar). Eggleton is a Fellow of both the Australian Academy of Science and the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering, the OSA, the SPIE, the IEEE, and the Royal Society of NSW.

JUN
01

1303rd OGM and Open Lecture

Professor Anne Twomey “Federalism, borders, and National Cabinet — What has the pandemic taught us?”

Professor Anne Twomey AO

Professor of Constitutional Law
Sydney Law School, University of Sydney

Date: Wednesday, 1 June 2022, 6.30 pm AEST 
Venue: To be advised.
Entry: To be advised
All are welcome

Summary:  Professor Twomey will discuss who is responsible for matters such as State border closures, quarantine and vaccine mandates, and what the Constitution has to say about it. The operation of a federal system in a national crisis, such as a pandemic, can cause confusion, but also reap benefits. The National Cabinet was supposed to provide national coordination while still allowing each State to deal with the different circumstances it faced. Has it succeeded, or is it just a mechanism for spreading a cloak of secrecy over government operations?

Anne Twomey is a Professor of Constitutional Law at the University of Sydney. She has previously worked for the High Court, the Senate Legal and Constitutional Committee, and the Cabinet Office of New South Wales. She has had practical experience in the operation of federalism, when working for the NSW Government, and has written extensively on federalism in the academic sphere.

JUL
06

1304th OGM and Open Lecture

Emeritus Professor Hugh White “This is going to be different: Learning to live with Chinese Power”

Professor Hugh White AO FASSA

Emeritus Professor of Strategic Studies, Australian National University

Date: Wednesday, 6 July 2022, 6.30 pm AEST 
Venue: Zoom Webinar.  Click here for help with getting started with Zoom. 
Entry: No Charge
All are welcome

Summary:  China's rise drives the most consequential shift in Australia's international environment since European settlement. So far we are in denial about this, hoping that a reassertion of American supremacy will contain China's power and preserve the old US-led regional order which has served us so well. But what are the chances of those hopes being realised, and what can we do if they are dashed? How does Australia make its way in an Asia no longer dominated by our Great and Powerful Friends? How we answer that question will do much to define us as a nation.

Professor Hugh White AO FASSA is Emeritus Professor of Strategic Studies at the Australian National University in Canberra. He spent much of his career in the Australian Government, including as International Relations Advisor to Prime Minister Bob Hawke and Deputy Secretary for Strategy in the Department of Defence. He was the founding Director of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute, and from 2004 to 2011 he was Head of ANU’s Strategic and Defence Studies Centre. His major publications include Power Shift: Australia’s future between Washington and Beijing, [2010], The China Choice: Why America should share power, [2012], Without America: Australia’s future in the New Asia [2017], and How to defend Australia [2019]. In the 1970s he studied philosophy at the universities of Melbourne and Oxford.

SEP
07

1306th OGM and Open Lecture

Emeritus Professor Hugh White “Is Fairweather an Australian artist? And does it matter?”


Claire Roberts FAHA (1)

     in conversation with

Nicholas Jose (2)

(1) Associate Professor of Art History, University of Melbourne

(2) Novelist and Emeritus Professor, University of Adelaide

Date: Wednesday, 7 September 2022, 6.30 pm AEST 
Venue: Zoom Webinar.  Click here for help with getting started with Zoom. 
Entry: No Charge
All are welcome

Photo credit: Zöe Harrison

Summary: After a life of wandering, including extended periods living in China, Bali and the Philippines, the Scottish-born artist Ian Fairweather (1891-1974) settled on Bribie Island off the coast of Queensland. Working in a self-made house constructed from bush materials Fairweather created works that prompted a leading Sydney critic to name him ‘our greatest painter’. In her new book Fairweather and China (2021) Claire Roberts seeks to reposition Fairweather as a key transcultural figure, connecting British, European, Chinese and Australian art histories.

Claire Roberts is an art historian and curator specialising in modern and contemporary Chinese art and cultural flows between Australia and Asia. She is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Melbourne and a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities. Claire received her PhD from the Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Australian National University (2006). Her most recent books are Fairweather and China (2021); Ian Fairweather: A Life in Letters (edited with John Thompson, 2019) Photography and China (2013) and Friendship in Art: Fou Lei and Huang Binhong (2010).

Nicholas Jose has published novels, short stories, essays and non-fiction and was general editor of the Macquarie PEN Anthology of Australian Literature. He recently co-edited Antipodean China: Reflections on Literary Exchange (2021) and Everything Changes: Australian Writers and China—A transcultural anthology (2020). He was Cultural Counsellor at the Australian Embassy Beijing, 1987-1990 and Harvard Chair of Australian Studies, 2009-10. He is currently Emeritus Professor of English and Creative Writing at The University of Adelaide and Adjunct Professor, Writing and Society Research Centre, Western Sydney University.

JAN
01

Calendar of Meetings 2022

RSNSW SealEvents Calendar for the Royal Society of NSW in 2022.

Please check this page regularly since the program is under ongoing development and may be affected by the prevalence of COVID-19 during early 2022.

Last update: 21 January 2022


Follow the links below for meetings held by the Society in Sydney, in Newcastle by the Hunter Branch, in Mittagong by the Southern Highlands Branch, and in western NSW by the Western NSW Branch.

Sydney Meetings 2022

Please note that the program in the table below lists events that are scheduled as monthly Ordinary General Meetings and the Annual Forum of the Royal Society and Learned Academies. In addition to these events, there are additional named lectures, associated with the Society’s Awards that remain to be scheduled:

  • Clarke Memorial Lecture — for 2020 (delayed) and 2021
  • Liversidge Lecture — 2020 (delayed)
  • Poggendorff Lecture — 2020 (delayed) and 2021
  • Pollock Memorial Lecture  — 2021

together with lectures in the [email protected] series.

Wednesday,
2 February

6.30 pm AEST

1300th OGM and Open Lecture

Venue: Zoom Webinar

Where next for higher education after COVID-19?
Professor Mark Scott AO FRSN
Vice-Chancellor and Principal, University of Sydney 

Wednesday,
2 March

6.30 pm AEDT

1301st OGM and Open Lecture
2021 Jak Kelly Award and RSNSW Scholarship Award Presentations

Venue: Zoom Webinar

Presentations: to be advised
Presenters: to be advised

Thursday,
17 March

6.30 pm AEDT

Clarke Memorial Lecture (2020–delayed) of the Royal Society of NSW

Venue: Macquarie University and live-streaming

From bulldozers, pests, and pathogens to climate change and urban futures: the tough life of plants
Distinguished Professor Michelle Leishman
Director, Smart Green Cities, Macquarie University

Wednesday,
6 April

6.30 pm AEST

1302nd OGM and Open Lecture

Venue: to be advised

New frontiers in smart sensor technology for a healthier, safer and sustainable future
Professor Ben Eggleton FRSN FAA FTSE FOSA FIEEE FSPIE
Director, University of Sydney Nano Institute
Co-Director, NSW Smart Sensing Network

Thursday,
21 April

6.30 pm AEST

[email protected]: April 2022

Venue: Zoom Webinar

Topic: to be advised
Richard Tognetti AO
Artistic Director and Leader, Australian Chamber Orchestra

Wednesday,
4 May

6.30 pm AEST

Liversidge Lecture (2020–delayed) 

Venue: University of Sydney and live streaming

Topic: to be advised
Professor Richard Payne FRSN 
Professor of Organic Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of Sydney and Deputy Director, ARC Centre of Excellence for Innovations in Peptide and Protein Science

Wednesday,
1 June

6.30 pm AEST

1303rd OGM and Open Lecture

Venue: to be advised

Federalism, borders and National Cabinet: What has the pandemic taught us?
Professor Anne Twomey AO 
Professor of Constitutional Law and Director, Constitutional Reform Unit
University of Sydney

Wednesday,
6 July

6.30 pm AEST

1304th OGM and Open Lecture

Venue: Zoom Webinar

This is going to be different: Learning to live with Chinese power
Emeritus Professor Hugh White AO FASSA
Emeritus Professor of Strategic Studies, Australian National University

Wednesday,
27 July

6.30 pm AEST

[email protected]: July 2022

Venue: Zoom Webinar

Topic: to be advised
Rachel Perkins
Australian film and television director, producer, and screenwriter

Wednesday,
3 August

6.30 pm AEST

1305th OGM and Open Lecture

Venue: to be advised

Topic: to be advised
Professor Kathy Belov AO FRSN
Professor of Comparative Genomics and Pro Vice-Chancellor (Global Engagement), University of Sydney

Wednesday,
7 September

6.30 pm AEST

1306th OGM and Open Lecture

Venue: Zoom Webinar

Is Fairweather an Australian artist? And does it matter?
Claire Roberts (1) in conversation with Nick Jose (2) 
(1) Associate Professor of Art History and ARC Future Fellow, University of Melbourne
(2) Novelist and Emeritus Professor, University of Adelaide 

Wednesday,
5 October

6.30 pm AEDT

1307th OGM and Open Lecture

Venue: to be advised

Topic: to be advised
Presenter: to be advised 

Thursday,
3 November

6.30 pm AEDT

Royal Society of NSW and Learned Societies Annual Forum

Venue: to be advised

Topic: to be advised
Presenter: to be advised 

Wednesday,
1 December

6.30 pm AEDT

1308th OGM and Open Lecture

Venue: to be advised

Topic: to be advised
Presenter: to be advised 

Return to the top of page

Hunter Branch Meetings

The Hunter Branch Event Program for 2022 is still under development.

Return to the top of page

Southern Highlands Branch Meetings

The Southern Highlands Branch Event Program for 2022 is still under development.

Return to the top of page

Western NSW Branch Meetings

The Western NSW Branch Event Program for 2022 is still under development

Tuesday,
15 March

Time: 1.00pm

Western NSW Meeting 2022-1

Venue: Fac-to-face

Annual General Meeting 
followed by a panel discussion on Trust and Science

Ponton Theatre, Charles Stuart University (Bathurst Campus)

Wednesday,
18 May

Time: 12.00pm

Western NSW Meeting 2022-2

Venue: face-to-face

Making a living on the Plains — Stone tools and Archaeology of Aboriginal societies 

Dr Colin Pardoe FRSN MAIATSIS

Wal Fife Theatre (Building 14, Room 212) Charles Stuart University (Wagga Wagga Campus) 

Return to the top of page

  

We use cookies on our website. Some of them are essential for the operation of the site, while others help us to improve this site and the user experience (tracking cookies). You can decide for yourself whether you want to allow cookies or not. Please note that if you reject them, you may not be able to use all the functionalities of the site.