1267th OGM and open lecture - Royal Society of NSW News & Events - The Royal Society of NSW

1267th OGM and open lecture

wallace   “3D printing of body parts: practical applications
   and fundamental explorations” 

   Professor Gordon Wallace AO FRSN
   Director, Intelligent Polymer Research Institute
   University of Wollongong

There will also be a 3-minute thesis talk: “Knowing your alien” by Mr Yingyod Lapwong, Faculty of Science, University of Technology Sydney.

Date: Wednesday 3 October 2018, 6pm for 6.30
Venue: Gallery Room, State Library of NSW (enter by Shakespeare Place)
Entry (includes a welcome drink): $25 for non-members, $15 for Members and Associate Members of RSNSW, $5 for student Members and Associate Members
Dress code: business
Dinner (including drinks): $85 for Members and Associate Members, $95 for non-members. Reservations must be made at least 2 days before.
Reservations: here
Enquiries: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or phone 9431 8691
All are welcome

In recent times we have witnessed medical breakthroughs enabled by advances in cell therapies, biomaterials science and 3D printing. The convergence of these three areas has enabled rapid progress. We have seen this impact on customised wearable prosthetics as well as implantable components (such as 3D metal printed jaw or heel implants) that provide structural support. The ability to replicate not just 3D shapes but also the distribution of mechanical properties from medical imaging data is being used to create models to understand airway collapse and to develop innovative intervention strategies in sleep apnoea. Polymer based 3D printed structures have been used to provide scaffolds that facilitate tissue regeneration through strategic distribution of bioactive molecules including drugs and growth factors.

Perhaps the ultimate regenerative platform is a 3D printed structure that contains stem cells configured in an appropriate chemical and mechanical environment to induce appropriate tissue regeneration. This ability to create 3D structures containing living cells is impacting on diverse clinical challenges. These include cartilage regeneration using adipose stem cells and corneal regeneration using limbal stem cells. My research team is developing 3D printing protocols to allow for more effective transplantation of islet cells to treat Type 1 Diabetes. These new approaches to the assembly of cells within 3D structures are also enabling unprecedented fundamental explanations in to the development of stem cells.

My research team is particularly interested in the development into neural lineages. Our quest to create a “brain on a bench” is expected to enable us to better understand the development of illnesses such as epilepsy and schizophrenia and to devise more innovative interventions. Check out our MOOC on 3D Bioprinting (www.futurelearn.com/courses/bioprinting). In this talk I will report on our most recent studies on printing stem cells and the impact of the printed environment on stem cell development. I will also touch on some non-technical challenges arising in this rapidly developing area of medical research: ethical and regulatory issues.


Professor Wallace is Executive Research Director of the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science and Director of the Australian National Fabrication Facility, Materials Node at the University of Wollongong. His research focuses on the design and discovery of new materials for use in energy and health. In the health area this involves using new materials to develop biocommunications from the molecular to skeletal domains in order to improve human performance. In the energy area this involves use of new materials to transform and to store energy, including novel wearable and implantable energy systems for the use in medical technologies.

He is committed to fundamental research and the translation of fundamental discoveries into practical applications. He is a passionate communicator, dedicated to explaining scientific advances to all in the community from the lay person to the specialist

Professor Wallace was named NSW Scientist of the Year 2017 and was appointed as an Officer of the Order of Australia in 2017. He received the Eureka Prize for Leadership in Science and Innovation in 2016 and was appointed to the Prime Minister’s Knowledge Nation 100 in 2015.

He has published more than 900 refereed publications that have attracted in excess of 35,000 citations, plus a monograph on Organic Bionics (published 2012), and he recently co-authored an eBook on 3D BioPrinting. He led the presentation of a MOOC on 3D Bioprinting on the FutureLearn platform.

 

About the Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition

The Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition brings together some of the best and brightest PhD students, who have just three minutes to explain what they are doing, how they are doing it, and why it is important. The competition cultivates students’ academic, presentation, and research communication skills, and their capacity to communicate complex ideas to a non-specialist audience. Competitors are allowed one PowerPoint slide, but no other resources or props.

At this month’s OGM Mr Yingyod Lapwong, a PhD student from University of Technology Sydney, will give a 3MT on his research: “Know your alien”. It focuses on alien species, which are an important environmental problem in Australia. Every year, the government spends a lot of money and effort to try to control these unwanted species. His research is about better understanding such species in order to develop better management systems to control them.

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